Michael Chui

Partner, San Francisco, USA

Dr. Michael Chui is a partner at the McKinsey Global Institute (MGI), McKinsey's business and economics research arm. He leads research on the impact of disruptive technologies and innovation on business, the economy, and society.

Publications

Artificial intelligence in business: Separating the real from the hype

AI is already changing fields from automotive to retail. The challenge is helping people change so they can use AI effectively.

Human + machine: A new era of automation in manufacturing

In the new automation, humans and machines will increasingly work side by side.

Where machines could replace humans—and where they can’t (yet)

Understanding how the technical potential for automation differs across sectors and activities can help organizations prepare for change.

Four fundamentals of workplace automation

Interim findings from a major research on workplace automation suggest that fewer than 5 percent of occupations can be entirely automated.

Clouds, big data, and smart assets

Senior executives need to strategically prepare their organizations for the swift changes that advancing technologies bring

How companies are benefiting from Web 2.0

The heaviest users of Web 2.0 applications are also enjoying benefits that often have a measurable effect on the business

The Internet of Things

The growth of sensor-based communications is creating promising new business model opportunities and reduced costs and risks

The next step in open innovation

The creation of knowledge, products and services by online communities of companies and consumers is still in its earliest stages. What's next?

What AI can and can’t do (yet)

Anyone looking for AI to transform their operations has to understand AI's limitations. Our experts walk you through what AI can do right now, and—even more important—what it can't.

Jobs lost, jobs gained

Automation and related technologies will transform the workforce. But the details matter, and those may differ in fundamental ways from what people expect—and fear.